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Original Research Articles

Disability Inclusive Development Good Practices: Level of Commitment to Core Concepts of Human Rights

Authors:

Cheryl Henderson,

University of Melbourne, AU
About Cheryl

Cheryl Henderson holds a Masters in Public Health from Melbourne Univsersity class of 2014. She completed a professional practice unit internship at the Nossal Institute for Global Health and holds a B.Sc. in Physiotherapy.

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Hasheem Mannan,

School of Nursing, Midwifery and Health Systems, University College Dublin; Centre for Global Health, Trinity College Dublin, IE
About Hasheem

Hasheem Mannan joined the School of Nursing, Midwifery, and Health Systems as Senior Lecturer in January 2015.  Hasheem completed his PhD on disability policy and family studies at the University of Kansas, USA in 2005. Most recently he was a Senior Research Fellow at the Nossal Institute for Global Health,University of Melbourne. Prior to that he was a Senior Research Fellow at the Centre for Global Health, Trinity College Dublin. He also held a two year Marie Curie Fellowship at the National Institute for Intellectual Disabilities, Trinity College Dublin. He has worked for the University of Kansas, the World Health Organization, the US National Center for Health Statistics, and the National Disability Authority (Ireland). Hasheem's areas of expertise include content analysis of health policies; human resources for health and service delivery; disability measurement and statistics; and social inclusion.

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Jessica Power

Centre for Global Health, Trinity College Dublin, IE
About Jessica

Jessica Power is a Doctoral researcher in Global Health at the Centre for Global Health, Trinity College Dublin since 2015. She is a physiotherapist and holds an MSc in Global Health. Her previous research is in the areas of community-based rehabiliation, human resources for health, human rights and assistive technologies.

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Abstract

Aim: Good practices have been documented by International Non-Governmental Organisations (INGOs) to promote disability inclusive development and encourage the replication or scaling up of good practices that use rights based approaches. This study aimed to investigate the extent to which Core Concepts of human rights are illustrated in disability inclusive development good practices related to health.

Methods: This study analysed case studies of disability inclusive development good practices focusing on health that are available in the public domain using EquiFrame, an established content analysis framework in benchmarking health and social policies.

Results: A total of 42 health related good practices were identified from 3 different INGOs working in the field of disability inclusive development. The highest occurring human rights Core Concepts were; access 55%, individualised services 48%, capacity building 45% and participation 38%. The Core Concepts with the lowest levels of commitment were; autonomy 3%, cultural responsiveness 3%, accountability 3%, and efficiency 3%. Privacy and autonomy were not mentioned at all. The quality of reporting of the core concepts of human rights was low as they did not state specific programme actions or intentions to monitor Core Concepts.

Conclusion: Level of commitment to Core Concept coverage and quality of reporting was low. EquiFrame was successfully extended to analyse disability inclusive development good practices focusing on health. Its use in further analysis of inclusive good practice is advised.

Implications: These results can be used for advocacy in disability inclusive development and to guide programme staff training and documentation of disability inclusive development good practices.
How to Cite: Henderson, C., Mannan, H. and Power, J., 2017. Disability Inclusive Development Good Practices: Level of Commitment to Core Concepts of Human Rights. Disability, CBR & Inclusive Development, 28(3), pp.32–55. DOI: http://doi.org/10.5463/dcid.v28i3.608
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Published on 27 Nov 2017.

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