Start Submission Become a Reviewer

Reading: Impact of Long-term Use of Adaptive Seating Device among Children with Cerebral Palsy and th...

Download

A- A+
Alt. Display

Brief reports

Impact of Long-term Use of Adaptive Seating Device among Children with Cerebral Palsy and their Families in Mumbai, India: A feasibility study

Authors:

Swati Ashok Kurne ,

All India Institute of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Mumbai, IN
About Swati Ashok

Swati Ashok Kurne received her Master's degree in Occupational Therapy in 2007 from Mumbai University and Bachelor's degree in Occupational Therapy in 2004 from Maharashtra University of Health Sciences in Nashik. She works as an Occupational Therapist at All India Institute of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation in Mumbai. Over her career, Swati has been afforded the opportunity to work with different client groups and has built a diverse client set. She has experience with seating devices, pediatrics and adult neurorehabilitation. Her passion is working with people to help them return to function in day to day activities by helping to identify and overcome barriers. Her major research interests include studying visual perceptual skills following brain lesion and clinical applicability of TVPS (Test of visual perceptual skills) in brain lesion.

X close

Anita Dipak Gupta

All India Institute of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Mumbai, IN
About Anita Dipak

Gupta is a lecturer in Occupational Therapy at AIIPMR, Mumbai. She received her Master's Degree in Occupational Therapy in 1995 from Mumbai University and Bachelor's in Occupational Therapy in 1985 from Nagpur University, India. She has been a Post Graudate Teacher and guide for Maharashtra University of Health Sciences. She was deputed as Jr. Scientific Officer on a project on Myoelectric prosthesis for below amputees. She has presented scientific papers and published research articles on various topics like Disabled Drivers Modifications, Spastic hand, Myoelectric Prosthesis etc.

Her recent publication is on Comparision of below-elbow cock up splint with elbow gutter versus above elbow cock up splint.

X close

Abstract

Purpose: There is evidence that adaptive seating devices can play a major role in the positioning and support of children with cerebral palsy (CP), and be of great benefit to them and their families. This study aims to provide preliminary information on the impact of long-term use of seating devices on the functional life of children with cerebral palsy.

Method: Family Impact of Assistive Technology Scale (FIATS) was used to assess the impact of the chair among children with cerebral palsy. The study participants consisted of 15 parents (9 mothers and 6 fathers) of young children (12 males and 3 females) with cerebral palsy. On the basis of Gross Motor Functional Classification System (GMFCS), 1 child at level III ,7 children at level IV, and 7 children at level V were included in the study.  Mean age of the children was 5 years, and the mean duration of use of adaptive seating was 13 months.

Results: It was found that the uninterrupted use of adaptive seating devices had an overall positive effect on the lives of families of children with GMFCS levels III, IV and V as measured by FIATS. The greatest benefits were in relation to the children’s social interactions, the acceptance of assistive technology by parents, feeling of contentment among children, and the degree of autonomy over their own activities and in the performance of these activities independently.

Conclusions: From the perspective of parents, FIATS is a measurement instrument that focusses on domains that give quantitative descriptions of a wide range of seating devices when used in a child’s home environment. Use of FIATS helps therapists to take a judicious approach regarding long-term use of seating devices. Parents’ perceptions can help in this process.

How to Cite: Kurne, S.A. and Gupta, A.D., 2016. Impact of Long-term Use of Adaptive Seating Device among Children with Cerebral Palsy and their Families in Mumbai, India: A feasibility study. Disability, CBR & Inclusive Development, 27(3), pp.118–131. DOI: http://doi.org/10.5463/dcid.v27i3.465
Published on 14 Nov 2016.
Peer Reviewed

Downloads

  • PDF (EN)