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Original Research Articles

Effects of Multisensory Training on Balance and Gait in Persons with Type 2 Diabetes: A Randomised Controlled Trial

Authors:

Nizar Abdul Majeed Kutty ,

Nizar Abdul Majeed Kutty, University Tunku Abdul Rahman, MY
About Nizar Abdul Majeed

The author holds a Masters degree in Physiotherapy from Mahatma Gandhi University, India. He is a lecturer at the Department of Physiotherapy, University Tunku Abdul Rahman, Malaysia. His research areas include multi-sensory reweighting, addiction disorders and plyometrics.

He has presented his research findings in many international conferences and has published articles in prolific journals, apart from serving as the Head of the Department of Physiotherapy in Mahatma Gandhi University, India.

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Nishad Abdul Latheef Majida

A M Physiotherapy Centre, Kerala, IN
About Nishad Abdul Latheef

The author has graduated from Mahatma Gandhi University and holds a Diploma in Yoga Therapy, apart from training in pranic healing and taping courses to enhance his treatment skills. He has focused on orthopedic and neurological conditions, specially among soccer players and is involved in helping patients regain an active lifestyle.

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Abstract

Purpose: Progressive deterioration of physical function occurs in persons with Type 2 diabetes and peripheral neuropathy. This study assessed the effects of multisensory training on balance and gait in persons with diabetic neuropathies.

Method: Thirty two persons with peripheral neuropathies were enrolled, randomised, and subdivided into 2 groups - an experimental group of 16 participants with diabetes (65 ± 2.12 years) and a control group of 16 participants with diabetes (68 ± 2.17 years). For 6 weeks, both groups were given health education on diabetes for 30 minutes a week. In addition, the experimental group practised a multisensory exercise programme for 30 minutes, 3 times a week over 6 weeks. Outcome measures used were ‘timed up and go’ test for assessing balance and ‘6-minute walk’ test for gait. Standard descriptive statistics were used to report means, standard deviation, and range for baseline characteristics. Paired and unpaired ‘t-tests’ were used wherever necessary, to determine significant differences in data among groups and between pre-test and post-test scores (p<0.05).

Results: By the end of the trial period, the intervention group showed a significant improvement in scores of the ‘timed up and go’ test (t= 14.7092), but there was no statistically significant difference in the ‘6-minute walk’ test scores (p=0.7206, t= 0.3644).There was no difference for both measures in the control group.

Conclusion: The study showed that multisensory exercises could improve balance in persons with Type 2 diabetes and peripheral neuropathy. The findings suggest that along with physiological sensory factors, cognitive-behavioural factors and strengthening of the lower limb muscles should be considered when treating diabetic persons with gait alterations.

How to Cite: Kutty, N.A.M. and Majida, N.A.L., 2013. Effects of Multisensory Training on Balance and Gait in Persons with Type 2 Diabetes: A Randomised Controlled Trial. Disability, CBR & Inclusive Development, 24(2), pp.79–91. DOI: http://doi.org/10.5463/dcid.v24i2.206
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Published on 28 Jul 2013.

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